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Zivid Studio User Guide

An easy tool designed to help you get started using the Zivid camera

Introduction

Overview of the Zivid Studio
User Interface 

In-Depth

A comprehensive guide
to Zivid Studio.

Examples

Learn how to capture images of dark, colored, and shiny objects.

An Introduction to Zivid Studio

What is Zivid Studio?


Zivid Studio is an application that provides you with a simple graphical user interface (GUI) to explore the functionality of Zivid, our advanced and exceptionally accurate 3D camera.

 

What to expect with Zivid Studio?

With Zivid Studio you can explore all the available functions of the Zivid camera to correctly develop your application. You can:

  • Visualize the 3D point cloud, 2D image and depth data
  • Save the point cloud to disk
  • Determine the correct settings for your sample object
  • Enable live mode to view the 3D point cloud in real time
  • Evaluate data quality in high quality 3D images

A point cloud is a 3D representation of an image. A good point cloud is characterized by dense points and no missing data, yielding a life-like 3D model of the captured scene.

 

 

1.1 cropped

 

 Fig.1.1 The image below displays a screenshot of Zivid Studio in use.

 

 

Overview of User interface elements in Zivid Studio

1.1 Toolbar

The Zivid Studio toolbar on the top of the interface comprises of some options to allow you to save your image, control the interface, and get information about the Zivid Studio interface being used.

 

initial-1

Fig.1.2 Toolbar options with Zivid Studio

 

 Option

Function

File

 
Open Loads a .ZDF file which is the native Zivid file format. ZDF files include the point cloud, 2D image, basic settings used to capture the point cloud and camera info

Save

Saves the point cloud in the chosen file format. Saving as .ZDF will also store the 2D image and the depth image.

 

Export

Allows you to export the .zdf file as PLY file (*.ply  as ordered or unordered)/ ASCII points file (*xyz)/ Point cloud data file (*.pcd)

 

Exit

Exits Zivid Studio

 

View

 

Reset 3D View

Resets the layout of the 3D point cloud

 

Color

Turns the color on or off. When color is turned off, all acquired pixels in the point cloud are represented in green

 

Mesh

Creates the appearance of a mesh between all available points in the point cloud.

 

Reset UI layout

Resets the layout of the Zivid Studio window including the 3D point cloud, 2D image and depth image

 

Enter full screen mode

Toggles between full and regular screen

 

Help

 

View help online

Redirects you to the Zivid knowledge base

 

Legal Notice

Gives you detailed legal information and third-party software notices

 

 

Table 1.1 Zivid Studio Toolbar description

 

1.2 Available views 

There are three available views to choose from at the bottom of the Zivid Studio interface as shown in Fig. 1.3

 

ZividStudioModes

 

Fig.1.3 Available views 

  • 3D Point Cloud

This view displays the 3D point cloud of the scene after capture, or in real time when using the live mode. This is a flexible view with zoom, pan, and rotate functionality. Use the left mouse button to rotate the point cloud and the right mouse button to pan the view. You can zoom in or out by rolling the mouse wheel, or by the middle mouse button (if available) followed by dragging the mouse.

 

ZividStudioCups1

Fig.1.4 3D point cloud

 

  • 2D Color

You can view the 2D image by choosing the 2D color tab at the bottom. Zoom and pan functionality is available, however rotate function is not available with this view.

 

2d color

Fig.1.5 2D color image

 

  • 2D Depth

This view displays the depth image of the imaged objects. The color scale shows the variation in distance along the z-axis from the camera to the surfaces of the imaged objects.

 depth

 Fig.1.6 2D depth image

 

 

1.3 Capture your first image in 3 steps

Step 1. Enter live mode

 

Capture

Fig.1.7 Enter live mode

 

Step 2. Determine optimal settings to acquire dense points over the entire scene.

 

 The camera has an active iris that controls the amount of light that gets into the camera. The iris can have values from 0-72 where a higher value lets more light in. The iris is open enough to capture objects from a scene at around iris value 8-10. As you keep on increasing the iris you will continue to acquire more and more points on your object until a certain iris value. Beyond this iris value, you will start losing points on your object. A sample graph for a white object is shown below.

 

graph

Fig.1.8 Number of pixels acquired and iris value for a white sample object

 

The Zivid camera can capture high quality images for many objects with a single iris. However, depending on the objects being imaged, you may need more than one iris value to get points on the whole scene.

 

  • Find the iris value that gives you max points on the scene
  • Address any areas with missing points. Click add frame to add more iris values
  • For dark objects in your scene, if you have to increase the iris beyond 40 to get points, increase the exposure time in increments until you can get points with an iris value 40 or below. This will help you retain depth of field for the images.
  • Use the available parameters like the reflection filter

 

Fig. 1.5

 

Fig.1.9 Choosing optimal settings 

 

Do not choose iris values randomly or in increments. This reduces data quality. Ensure that you adjust the iris slider in live mode to find the iris(es) that render points over the whole scene. If multiple irises are required, click add frame

 

Step 3. Click Single/HDR  to view the resulting point cloud

 

 

1.4 Basic settings

There are several unique filters and settings available in Zivid Studio to ensure that you get a high-quality point cloud. The basic settings to adjust in order to capture a good 3D image are iris, exposure time and brightness.

 

 

Fig.1.6

Fig.1.10 Basic settings in Zivid Studio

 

To ensure that images retain depth of field, set the iris values below 40 and increase the exposure time instead to compensate for loss of light.

 

1.5 Single frame vs. multi frame HDR

Finding the best combination of iris and exposure time settings 

You can increase the amount of light entering the camera by

  • Increasing the iris value OR
  • Increasing the exposure time setting

In Fig 1.7, different combinations of iris and exposure time settings are used to capture four good images with dense points. However, Image 4 with the highest exposure time and the lowest iris retains the most depth of focus and has the sharpest point cloud.

 

Increasing the exposure time will require you to decrease the iris for similar results

Decreasing the exposure time will require you to increase the iris for similar results



Multi frame HDR: 

 

All the settings available within Zivid Studio are clustered into frames. For each frame specified, the camera captures an image with all the associated settings (iris, exposure time, brightness etc.) for that frame. The images corresponding to each frame are finally combined to display a single high-quality HDR output image. Refer image 1.9 for illustration.

 

Fig.1.8-1

 

Fig.1.11 Single capture or multi frame HDR capture 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Understanding Zivid Studio settings in detail

 2.1 Zivid Studio features
Capture Dialog Options

 

page16

 

Fig. 2.1 Options on the capture dialog

 

 

Functions and settings

 

page17

 

page18

 

 Fig. 2.2 Zivid Studio Functions

 

 
2.2 Aperture control, electronic iris and corresponding f-numbers

The electronic iris is an adjustable opening (aperture), which controls the amount of light coming through the lens (i.e. the "exposure"). The more you open the iris, the more light comes in and the picture appears brighter. The iris can have values from 0 to 72 where higher values lets more light in. The iris is open enough to capture objects from a scene at around iris value range of 8-10. As you keep on increasing the iris you will continue to acquire more and more points on your object until a certain iris value. Beyond this iris value, you will start losing points on your object (Fig 1.8).

 

Reducing the aperture diameter (increasing the f-number) increases the depth of field because only the light travelling at shallower angles passes through the aperture.

 

rep4

 

 

rep3

 

 

 

Capturing Images: Examples

To help you understand how to take optimal images with your new 3D camera, we have compiled a few case scenarios with different types of materials.

Case 1: Dark objects

SAMPLE ZIVID ONE+ 3D CAMERA
MATERIAL BLACK ANODIZED ALUMINIUM AND PLASTIC
MODE MULTI FRAME
ESTIMATED TIME REQUIRED 4 MINUTES
AMBIENT LIGHTING LOW

STEPS

5

 

 

 3.1.1-1

 

 Fig.3.1.1 Zivid camera in 2D

 

Step 1: Enter live mode

Step 2: Adjust the iris slider to find the settings that gives you maximum number of points in the point cloud.

Step 3. Adjust the exposure time if necessary

 

KEPPING IRISES LOW

 

Step 4: If multiple irises are required, click add frame to introduce new iris(es). You can adjust the exposure time and other settings for every frame as required

 

preview your point cloud

 

 

Step 5: Click capture to view the resulting point cloud from all the defined frames. Turn color off (keyboard shortcut ‘c’) to ensure that you have points all over the black object or change settings if required.

For this case with the Zivid camera, the combination of iris values 15 and 36 along with the exposure time of 10000 produces a good point cloud. Fig.3.1.2 and 3.1.3. illustrate the need for multi-frame capture. Fig. 3.1.3 has dense points over most of the object, but some areas, e.g. around the edges and the Zivid logo do not have points unless you include iris 15.

 

 

 

 3.1.2-1

 

Fig.3.1.2 Single capture with Iris 15

 

 

 3.1.3-1

 

Fig.3.1.3 Single capture with Iris 36

 

 

 3.1.4-1

 

Fig.3.1.4 High quality point cloud using HDR mode with Iris 15 and 36

 

  

For this case with the Zivid camera, the combination of iris values 15 and 36 along with the exposure time of 10000 produces a good point cloud. Fig.3.1.2 and 3.1.3. illustrate the need for multi-frame capture. Fig. 3.1.3 has dense points over most of the object, but some areas, e.g. around the edges and the Zivid logo do not have points unless you include iris 15.

 

optimize ur settings

 

applciations

 

Fig. 3.1.5 Optimizing settings for your application

 

Case 2: Colored objects

 

SAMPLE MEFFERT'S CUBE
MATERIAL COLORED PLASTIC
MODE MULTI FRAME
ESTIMATED TIME REQUIRED 2 MINUTES
AMBIENT LIGHTING MEDIUM

STEPS

4

 

 

3.2.1

 

Fig.3.2.1 Image of a Meffert's cube in 2D

Step 1: Enter live mode

Step 2: Adjust the iris slider to find the settings that gives you maximum number of points in the point cloud

Step 3. Adjust the exposure time if necessary

For the Mefferts cube, it was not necessary to change the exposure time

Step 4: If multiple irises are required, click add frame to introduce new iris(es). You can also adjust the exposure time and other settings for every frame as required

 

case 2 preview your point cloud

 

Step 5: Click capture to view the resulting point cloud from all the defined frames. Turn color off (keyboard shortcut ‘c’) to ensure that you have points all over the black object or change settings if required

 

 

 

3.2.2

 Iris 21

 

 

3.2.3

Iris 30 

 

 Fig.3.2.2 Point cloud with Iris setting 21 and 30

 

Using 2 frames with irises 21 and 30 renders a high quality HDR image and a dense point cloud with no missing areas as shown in Fig.3.2.3

 

3.2.4

 

 3.2.4a-1

 Fig.3.2.3 High quality point cloud using HDR mode with iris 21 and 30

Case 3: Shiny metallic parts

 

SAMPLE METAL PIPE
MATERIAL SHINY METAL
MODE MULTI FRAME
ESTIMATED TIME REQUIRED 7 MINUTES
AMBIENT LIGHTING LOW

STEPS

5

 

 

3.3.1Fig.3.3.1 Image of the object in 2D

 

Step 1: Enter live mode

Step 2: Adjust the iris slider to find the settings that gives you maximum number of points in the point cloud

Step 3. Adjust the exposure time if necessary

Step 4: If multiple irises are required, click add frame to introduce new iris(es). You can adjust the exposure time and other settings for every frame as required

 

case 2 preview your point cloud

Step 5: Click Capture to view the resulting point cloud from all the defined frames. Turn color off (keyboard shortcut ‘c’) to ensure that you have points all over the black object or change settings if required

 

 

 

 Iris 37

3.3.2-1

 Iris 293.3.3b-1  Iris 203.3.3c-1
 Iris 143.3.3d-1  Iris 103.3.3e-2  HDR3.3.3f-1

Fig.3.3.2 Capturing HDR image of a shiny object

For this object, five iris values are required- 10, 14, 20, 29 and 37. Each of these active iris points were tested individually and confirmed to be the best combination of settings required for this object.

Fig.3.3.2 illustrates the result of these different iris values individually, and the final output with the use of Zivids unique HDR feature.

 

Iris 143.3.4a-1 Iris 113.3.4b-1 Iris 103.3.4c-1

 Fig.3.3.3 Capturing HDR image of a shiny object

 

Expert tip: On rotating the 3D image you may find noise points. These points can be chaotic if recognized as part of the object (e.g. In case of a bin-picking scenario). Zivid’s unique reflection filter solves this problem intelligently. Under Preferences, enable the reflection filter to eliminate noise points and get a noise free image.

 

 

Without Reflection Filter3.3.5a-1 With Reflection filter
3.3.5b-1

Fig.3.3.4 Effect of Zivid's unique reflection filter

 

These tips should help you capture an optimal image with a dense point cloud. Fig.3.3.5 displays the final output of the object used in this example.

 

 HDR without color3.3.6a-1  HDR with color3.3.6b-1

Fig.3.3.5 Final HDR image in 3D

Tips and tricks

 

  • Always use live mode to determine the best irises for your sample objects. Do not set the irises randomly or in increments. This compromises on speed and/or data quality.

 

  • Adding more irises does not necessarily optimize data quality. If the image was already optimized or if other parameters need to be tuned, adding more irises instead will only increase acquisition time.

      Example: For the shiny metal pipe, adding iris 11 when iris 10 and 14 are already set do not optimize the image further as the       points rendered by iris 11 are already included in the points given by iris 10 and 14.

 

i11-1   i14-1   i10-1

 

  • Use the Reflection Filter to get rid of noise points.

 

  • Use the Bidirectional filter if there are noise points that the reflection filter could not eliminate.

 

  • Adjust ambient light if possible. Low ambient lighting works best for acquiring sharp images, this is true for shiny parts in particular. If lighting cannot be adjusted, ensure that the brightness parameter is adjusted for the best results.

     E.g. Use brightness less than 1.0 in dark conditions, and higher than 1.0 in bright conditions.

 

  • Always set the recommended operational distance for your camera.

     Example: 0.5m for the Small, 0.8 m for the Medium, and 1.8 m for the Large cameras.

 

  • Use a dark background to capture high-quality point cloud easily, especially with shiny parts.

      E.g. Black bin/ black background.

 

  • To counter highlights in your point cloud, include a lower iris value. Use live mode to determine which iris to include.

      E.g. As shown in Fig.3.3.6, the highlight in the middle of the duct tape is countered by adding a lower iris of 13.

 

               highlights1    highlights 2

Fig. 4.3 Countering highlights with low irises

  • Hotkeys
 

Colour | c

Toggle full screen | F11

Reset 3D view | backspace

Capture | F5

Live | Shift+F5

Stop Live | Esc

Save | Ctrl+s

Open | Ctrl+o

Quit | Alt+F4

 

 

 

Troubleshooting

 

Here are some initial troubleshooting steps that will help you resolve any problem you face during set up. Should you encounter any difficulties, email us at customersuccess@zivid.com. Also check out our FAQ page and knowledge base at zivid.atlassian.net

 

1. Zivid Studio set up

 

If you are unable to launch Zivid Studio after an installation, please try the following steps (please note that the following steps are described for Windows 10, but similar approach should be done in Linux): 

  • Open “Add or remove programs” (in Windows 10)
  • Uninstall “Zivid
  • Uninstall “TeliCamSDK
  • Ensure that the files were properly uninstalled by deleting folders “C:\Program Files\Zivid” and “C\Program Files\TOSHIBA TELI
  •  Reinstall Zivid Studio and include all installation steps as shown below.

set up dialog

If you are still facing problems, please contact the Zivid team at customersuccess@zivid.com. 

 

2. Connecting to a Zivid camera with Zivid Studio 

 

If you are unable to find or connect to the Zivid camera in studio, please try the following steps (please note that the following steps are described for Windows 10, but similar approach should be done in Linux): 

 

  • Check that the camera is properly connected to power and USB3. Tighten screws and verify that it is properly connected to PC. On most PCs you can identify that it is an USB3 port if it looks like the following

Usb3

  • The camera will display a “Zivid” logo if it has power connected and boots up.
  • Make sure that no other program is occupying the Zivid Camera (such as Visual Studio).
  • In Zivid Studio on the right pane, click the “…” next to “Cameras” and select “Scan for connected cameras”.
  • If you still cannot detect a camera please verify that the drivers were correctly installed by going to “Device Manager” and looking for the following:

DM

  • In the case that you cannot see the Zivid Camera properly detected in the “Device Manager”, please go through the steps in Zivid Studio setup
  • Contact mailto:custmersuccess@zivid.com.

3. Error messages in Zivid Studio 

 

ERROR

RESOLUTION

 

No Camera found

 

 

  • Go to File< Scan for connected cameras
  • Restart Zivid Studio
  • Ensure that no other application is running Zivid
  • Ensure multiple tabs of Zivid Studio are not open

 

 

Failed to check if block 0 in the EEPROM master table is occupied

                    OR

Inconsistent frame timing detected, which would result in a broken point cloud

 

 

Ensure that the Zivid camera is not used by any other applications such as Cloud viewer, Zivid Studio, or Visual Studio. Also ensure that multiple tabs of the same application are not open.

 

Disconnection or freezing application

 

 

Ensure that the power and data cable are screwed in tightly into their slots. Loose cables will result in frequent loss of connection

 

4. Ambient lighting effects

 

Zivid cameras use projected light to determine the distance to objects in the scene. Ambient light introduce noise that affect the accuracy of the 3D sensors, and in worst case may cause data loss. The table below explains some effects of ambient light and how to deal with them.

 

Symptoms  Cause Possible solution

 

The 3D point cloud is changing over time with the same scene as if the settings used are no longer giving the same results as they did before. 

Changing light conditions such as automatically enabled or dimmed lights or sunlight entering through windows
  • Increase projector brightness to mitigate the effect. 
  • Provide shade from windows by using e.g. blinds. 
  • Disable light automation or take it into account in your software solution by changing settings depending on surrounding brightness

I’m seeing waves or ripple-like effects on planes in the point cloud. 

This could be caused by the power line frequency mixing into the sensor signal.  Use an Exposure Time equivalent to

texp=n2×fline, where

n is an integer and

fline is the power line frequency.  

 

In e.g. EU this is 50Hz, and in US this is 60Hz. For Europe, exposure times in multiples of 10’000 µs should be used, and multiples of 8’300 µs in the US. 

 

The 2D color image has very bright spots, or there could be spots of missing data in the 3D point cloud. 

Direct reflex from light sources may over saturate the sensor. 
  • Cover the projector (e.g. with your hand) and grab an image.  
  • Look at the 2D image in Zivid Studio and see if there are bright spots.  
  • If there are, try to assess where it comes from. It could be from a light bulb, the sun, or some other source.  If possible, eliminate them by facing them away, provide shade or similar. 

 

Zivid's inner workings 

Your Zivid camera is the world’s most accurate, real time 3D color camera because it has been developed and put together with much thought from your friends at Zivid to ensure that you have a fantastic 3D experience! So, what makes Zivid tick?

Here is a little background to help you know your camera better.

 

The Zivid camera functions on the principle of structured light. Zivid contains a projector and a camera that is placed at a specific angle to and distance from each other. Light patterns are projected by the projector onto the object and the displacement in the light patterns are used to calculate the depth of the object at every point giving you a 3D model of your object. For every image capture performed by Zivid, several images are captured internally by the camera at a remarkable acquisition rate of 10 Hz to ensure that the captured point cloud gives the most accurate data.

 

structured light-1

Fig. 5.1 Calculating depth with structured light

 

 

time multiplexd

Fig.5.2 Projection of striped light patterns

 

One of Zivid’s most unique features is the HDR capability. ‘Difficult’ objects are made easy with this feature. The HDR mode allows you to choose different iris settings which are best suited for the different colors or areas of your object. The camera captures images internally with each of these specified iris settings and these images are then combined to give you the best possible output with overall accuracy. 

 

Some other features that make Zivid special are the filters that give you added functionality. The Reflection filter for example ensures that you can take images of shiny objects without false, noise points. Consider a picking scenario where the camera mistook false points (points in the point cloud corresponding to reflections) as part of the object.  A robot attempting to perform a pick could aim at these false points instead, resulting in an erroneous and chaotic process!

 

Zivid also functions in the full color spectrum which renders a high quality, 3D point cloud with life-like resemblance.

 

Visit the Zivid One or Zivid One+ product pages for complete specs.

 

 

Support and Assistance

 

For more information about the Zivid cameras please visit www.zivid.com

For software related information and sample codes, visit www.zivid.com/software

For resource articles and the knowledge base, visit zivid.atlassian.net

For assistance, please email customersuccess@zivid.com